In ART

A major exhibit in Miami takes a look at artist John Miller’s key works

John Miller has been at the forefront of contemporary art since the 1980s. An American artist, critic and musician, Miller has created work that’s been displayed in major museums worldwide – his pieces are part of the collections of the Whitney Museum in New York and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, among others, and he’s had solo exhibits at Kunsthalle Zurich, Musée d’Art Moderne et Contemporain in Geneva and MoMA PS1 in New York. For the first time ever, a comprehensive survey of his work is showing at a US museum, the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) in Miami’s Design District.

On view until June 12, “I Stand, I Fall” brings together over 75 of Miller’s works, tracing his deployment of realist figuration across a range of media, including painting, sculpture, drawing, photography and video. With support from curator Alex Gartenfeld, Miller has created a show that presents his portrayal of society over three consecutive decades, depicting subjects that range from reality TV stars to shoppers and everyday working people.

ICA Miami- John Miller, Installation View

ICA Miami- John Miller, Installation View

On the ground floor of the ICA, an intriguing maze of mirrors draws visitors in, leading them to an oversized mannequin made from artificial fruit. The bulk of the exhibit takes place of the upper level, where works include Miller’s ongoing photographic series “The Middle of the Day,” which the artist shoots anywhere, any day, but only between noon and 2pm. His arresting portraits reference French poet Charles Baudelaire’s “flâneur,” a 19th-century figure drawn to the street’s powerful beat.

ICA Miami- John Miller, Installation View

ICA Miami- John Miller, Installation View

ICA Miami- John Miller, Installation View

ICA Miami- John Miller, Installation View

Paintings on display include “The Fatalistic Game,” depicting Native American drummers and exploring the fine line between preserving cultural traditions and becoming a mere tourist attraction. Like much of Miller’s diverse body of work, “The Fatalistic Game,” shines a critical light on social hierarchy and consumerism in America.

For more info, please visit www.icamiami.org

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