In ART

The IFPDA Fine Art Print Fair is a non-profit association representing a vetted community of 150 galleries and publishers of contemporary editions in 12 countries. Originally scheduled to be held at the Javits Center in New York with 70 booths, the IFPDA has moved the fair online, invited all 150 members to participate, and waived all exhibitor fees in response to the current economic and health crises.

Hauser & Wirth

Nicolas Party is known for applying his bright, graphic patterns onto everything from ceramics to furniture to floors, ceilings, doorways, and walls. Despite the surreal simplicity of his aesthetic, his work exemplifies his philosophy regarding colour theory and line.

Nicolas Party, Portrait for RXArt Children's Hospital Commission, 2019. Screenprint, 74.9 × 59.1 × 3.8 cm. Edition of 50

Nicolas Party, Portrait for RXArt Children’s Hospital Commission, 2019. Screenprint, 74.9 × 59.1 × 3.8 cm. Edition of 50

In diverse and intellectually complex works, Charles Gaines explores the accidental tension between logical systems and the human hand, and the ways in which meaning is derived from art.

Charles Gaines, Numbers and Trees, Tiergarten Series 3: Tree #2, May, 2018. Color aquatint and spitbite aquatint with printed acrylic box, 104.8 × 81.3 × 8.9 cm. Edition of 25 + 10 AP

Charles Gaines, Numbers and Trees, Tiergarten Series 3: Tree #2, May, 2018. Color aquatint and spitbite aquatint with printed acrylic box, 104.8 × 81.3 × 8.9 cm. Edition of 25 + 10 AP

Rashid Johnson’s practice is defined by its critical evocations and entangling of racial and cultural identity, African American history and mysticism. Johnson’s etchings ‘Untitled Anxious Men’ (2018) were a collaboration with Jennifer Melby in Brooklyn. The work relates to Untitled Anxious Men series, responding to the fundamental tensions and traumas that course through contemporary life.

Rashid Johnson, Untitled Anxious Man, 2018. Softground etching printed in black, 60.3 × 50.2 cm. Edition of 35

Rashid Johnson, Untitled Anxious Man, 2018. Softground etching printed in black, 60.3 × 50.2 cm. Edition of 35

Susan Sheehan Gallery

Susan Sheehan Gallery presents works by Andy Warhol, David Hockney and Joan Mitchell.

Andy Warhol, Details of Renaissance Paintings (Sandro Botticelli, Birth of Venus, 1482), 1984. Screenprint, 81.3 × 111.8 cm. Edition of 70 + proofs

Andy Warhol, Details of Renaissance Paintings (Sandro Botticelli, Birth of Venus, 1482), 1984. Screenprint, 81.3 × 111.8 cm. Edition of 70 + proofs


David Hockney, Lithograph of Water Made of Lines with Two Light Blue Washes, 1978-1980. Lithograph, 65.4 × 87 cm. Edition of 35 + proofs

David Hockney, Lithograph of Water Made of Lines with Two Light Blue Washes, 1978-1980. Lithograph, 65.4 × 87 cm. Edition of 35 + proofs


Joan Mitchell, Sunflowers III, 1992. Lithograph, 144.8 × 211.5 cm. Edition of 34 + proofs

Joan Mitchell, Sunflowers III, 1992. Lithograph, 144.8 × 211.5 cm. Edition of 34 + proofs

JIM KEMPNER FINE ART

Walking the line between respectful homage and brazen appropriation, Deborah Kass mimics and reworks the signature styles of some of the 20th century’s most iconic male artists—including Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, and Ed Ruscha—in her bold, meticulous paintings.

Deborah Kass, OY/YO, 2019. Powder coated aluminum with aluminum base, 18.4 × 36.2 × 8.9 cm. Edition of 50.

Deborah Kass, OY/YO, 2019. Powder coated aluminum with aluminum base, 18.4 × 36.2 × 8.9 cm. Edition of 50.

In his drawings and animations, William Kentridge articulates the concerns of post-Apartheid South Africa with unparalleled nuance and lyricism. In the inventive process by which he created his best-known works, Kentridge draws and erases with charcoal, recording his compositions at each state. He then displays a video projection of the looped images alongside their highly worked and re-worked source drawings.

William Kentridge, Lady (Xeno at 2am), 2001. Etching and sugarlift aquatint, 29 × 34.9 cm. Edition of 40

William Kentridge, Lady (Xeno at 2am), 2001. Etching and sugarlift aquatint, 29 × 34.9 cm. Edition of 40

One of the central figures of the Pop Art movement, Robert Indiana takes his inspiration from commercial signs, claiming: “There are more signs than trees in America. There are more signs than leaves. So I think of myself as a painter of American landscape.” He is most famous for his “LOVE” paintings and sculptures, first produced in the 1960s. Creating a block out of the word—with the “L” and the “O” set atop the “V” and the “E”—Indiana has effectively inserted his own sign into the mix.

Robert Indiana, Chosen Love (Red/Green/Blue), 2011. Chrome-dyed, archival wool tapestry, 243.8 × 243.8 cm. Edition of 175

Robert Indiana, Chosen Love (Red/Green/Blue), 2011. Chrome-dyed, archival wool tapestry, 243.8 × 243.8 cm. Edition of 175

The Lapis Press

Internationally acclaimed artist Shirin Neshat takes on loaded themes in photography, film, and video works that delve into issues of gender, identity, and politics in Muslim countries, and the relationship between the personal and political.

Shirin Neshat, I am its Secret (from Ten Works: The MOCA Photography Portfolio), 1999. Lightjet 5000 process, 49.5 × 61 cm. Edition of 250

Shirin Neshat, I am its Secret (from Ten Works: The MOCA Photography Portfolio), 1999. Lightjet 5000 process, 49.5 × 61 cm. Edition of 250

Rinko Kawauchi’s portfolio of 15 prints, entitled 4%, was inspired by the theory that merely 4% of the mass of the universe can be perceived and what remains is unknown. These images depict various microcosms from that known fraction of our universe. Each photograph embodies the poetic subtlety that is vividly represented throughout her work.

Rinko Kawauchi, Untitled, from the portfolio 4%, 2013. Pigmented ink print, 26 × 39.4 cm. Edition of 12

Rinko Kawauchi, Untitled, from the portfolio 4%, 2013. Pigmented ink print, 26 × 39.4 cm. Edition of 12

Working exclusively in portraiture, Kehinde Wiley fuses traditional formats and motifs with modern modes of representation. Wiley’s heroic figures are depicted in front of colourful background patterns that make specific reference to textiles and decorative patterns of various cultures.

Kehinde Wiley, Sophie Arnould Study II, 2016. Hand embellished pigment print on paper, 68.6 × 50.8 × 5.1 cm

Kehinde Wiley, Sophie Arnould Study II, 2016. Hand embellished pigment print on paper, 68.6 × 50.8 × 5.1 cm

Dolan Maxwell

DolanMaxwell presents works by Dox Thrash, Ed Clark and Terry Haass.

Dox Thrash, One Horse Farmer, ca. 1944-48. Carborundum mezzotint, 15.1 × 22.5 cm

Dox Thrash, One Horse Farmer, ca. 1944-48. Carborundum mezzotint, 15.1 × 22.5 cm


Ed Clark, Untitled (Purple/Blue), 1977. Intaglio relief, 56.8 × 76.2 cm

Ed Clark, Untitled (Purple/Blue), 1977. Intaglio relief, 56.8 × 76.2 cm


Terry Haass, Landscape with Animals, ca. 1947. Engraving, etching & aquatint, 27.6 × 35.2 cm

Terry Haass, Landscape with Animals, ca. 1947. Engraving, etching & aquatint, 27.6 × 35.2 cm

Gemini G.E.L. at Joni Moisant Weyl

It is hard to characterise John Baldessari’s varied practice—which includes photomontage, artist’s books, prints, paintings, film, performance, and installation—except through his approach of good-humoured irreverence. Baldessari is commonly associated with Conceptual or Minimalist art, though he has called this characterisation “a little bit boring.”

John Baldessari, Noses & Ears Etc.: The Gemini Series: Two Profiles, One with Nose and Turban (B&W); One with Ear (Color) and Hat, 2006. 2-layer, 12-color screenprint construction (mounted to Sintra and hand cut), framed, 87 × 144.1 × 7.6 cm. Edition of 45

John Baldessari, Noses & Ears Etc.: The Gemini Series: Two Profiles, One with Nose and Turban (B&W); One with Ear (Color) and Hat, 2006. 2-layer, 12-color screenprint construction (mounted to Sintra and hand cut), framed, 87 × 144.1 × 7.6 cm. Edition of 45

A sculptor, painter, and draughtsman, Jonathan Borofsky has explored in his work subjects as varied as dreams, labour and the boundaries between life and art.

Jonathan Borofsky, Human Structures #2, 2005. 52-color screenprint, 108 × 152.4 cm. Edition of 35

Jonathan Borofsky, Human Structures #2, 2005. 52-color screenprint, 108 × 152.4 cm. Edition of 35

Inspired early in his career by modern dance—notably through his relationship with members of New York City’s influential Judson Church dancers—and Japanese Zen gardens, Richard Serra sought to create works that engage viewers in movement, taking in his large-scale sheet-metal pieces by navigating the space around them.

Richard Serra, Finally Finished I, 2017. 1-color etching, 190.5 × 151.8 cm

Richard Serra, Finally Finished I, 2017. 1-color etching, 190.5 × 151.8 cm

The Tolman Collection

Hiratsuka was inspired by the Utamaro master woodblock print-maker from the 18th century Applying Makeup from 1790. This etching is a good example of the continuity that links Ukiyo-e to contemporary Japanese art.

Yuji Hiratsuka, Fan Art in front of Mirror, 2020. Etching, 45.7 × 30.5 cm. Edition of 15

Yuji Hiratsuka, Fan Art in front of Mirror, 2020. Etching, 45.7 × 30.5 cm. Edition of 15

This artwork was inspired by a Korean painting from the artist Byeoung Sangbyeok (active mid-18th century). The original features a group of swallows passing, but Sarah Brayer has removed the birds and added a glowing moon to heighten the tension between the two cats.

Sarah Brayer, Moontrance, 2000. Lithograph on handmade Mexican paper, 91.4 × 68.6 cm. Edition of 37

Sarah Brayer, Moontrance, 2000. Lithograph on handmade Mexican paper, 91.4 × 68.6 cm. Edition of 37

Galerie Maximillian

Winner of the 2003 Turner Prize, Grayson Perry creates ceramics and other objects that explore diverse historical and contemporary themes. Autobiographical references to the artist’s childhood, family and transvestite alter ego Claire are intertwined with his political and allegorical references, creating a challenging conflict between his dark themes and the rich beauty of his works.

Grayson Perry, Selfie with Political Causes, 2018. Etcing, 69.5 × 102.2 cm

Grayson Perry, Selfie with Political Causes, 2018. Etcing, 69.5 × 102.2 cm

Known for his colourful “puddle” paintings, Ian Davenport has gone to great lengths in the name of experimentation, once even using an industrial wind machine to blow paint onto a canvas. In his recent works, the artist has been applying paint with a syringe, allowing it to run down the support (often steel) in distinct bands and puddle at the base.

Ian Davenport, Colour Splats - Bang, 2019. Screenprint on Velin Arches 250gsm paper, 116.8 × 94 cm

Ian Davenport, Colour Splats – Bang, 2019. Screenprint on Velin Arches 250gsm paper, 116.8 × 94 cm

James Turrell has innovated photographic techniques that allow light to have a physical presence. Using holography to make the light itself the subject rather than the medium, Turrell creates coloured light installations that appear to possess mass and take up space as planes, cubes, pyramids, and tunnels.

James Turrell, About the work, Aten Reign, 2015. Archival Pigment, 109.2 × 161.3 cm

James Turrell, About the work, Aten Reign, 2015. Archival Pigment, 109.2 × 161.3 cm

Kiechel Fine Art

Kiechel Fine Art presents works by artists Charles Wilson, John Sloan and Luigi Lucioni

Charles Wilson, Morning on the Creek, 1969. Lithograph, 35.6 × 24.1 cm

Charles Wilson, Morning on the Creek, 1969. Lithograph, 35.6 × 24.1 cm


John Sloan, Robert Henri: Painter, 1931. Etching, 35.2 × 27.6 cm

John Sloan, Robert Henri: Painter, 1931. Etching, 35.2 × 27.6 cm


Luigi Lucioni, The Three Graces, 1950. Etching, 27.6 × 22.9 cm

Luigi Lucioni, The Three Graces, 1950. Etching, 27.6 × 22.9 cm

John Szoke

John Szoke specialises in works on paper by Pablo Picasso and Edvard Munch.

Edvard Munch, Tête-à-Tête (In the Digs), 1894. Etching and drypoint, 21.9 × 32.7 cm

Edvard Munch, Tête-à-Tête (In the Digs), 1894. Etching and drypoint, 21.9 × 32.7 cm


Pablo Picasso, Le Repas frugal, 1904. Etching, 57.7 × 44.5 cm. Edition of 27 or 29

Pablo Picasso, Le Repas frugal, 1904. Etching, 57.7 × 44.5 cm. Edition of 27 or 29

IFPDA Fine Art Print Fair is on view until the 13th of June.


The above descriptions are sourced from the galleries’ press releases.

Feature caption: Donald Teskey, Coastal Report. Acrylic, 76.2 × 104.1 cm

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